Événements

Avr
21
mer
2021
« Wild Animal Suffering: The Freedom-based Approach » @ Zoom
Avr 21 @ 12:30 – 13:45
"Wild Animal Suffering: The Freedom-based Approach" @ Zoom

Dans le cadre des midis de l’éthique du CRÉ, Eze Paez nous offrira une présentation intitulée « Wild Animal Suffering: The Freedom-based Approach ».

La présentation d’environ 40 minutes sera suivie d’une discussion d’environ la même durée. Via zoom.

Wild Animal Suffering: The Freedom-based Approach

Résumé

Wild animals probably have net negative lives because of the naturogenic harms they suffer (Ng 1995; Horta 2010; Tomasik 2015; Faria 2016). Since there are over 1 quintillion of them (Tomasik 2009), they constitute the majority of sentient individuals. It is important to determine what reasons, if any, we have to assist them.

Arguments for a permission or a requirement to help wild animals have been typically based on a concern for their well-being, rather than their freedom (Pearce 1995; Horta 2010; Palmer 2010; Faria 2014; McMahan 2015; Paez 2019a, 2019b). Even political accounts of our duty to help deny that animals have an interest in autonomy (Cochrane 2018). When a concern for the freedom, or sovereignty, of wild animal communities has appeared in the literature, it has been to argue for non-intervention (Donaldson and Kymlicka 2011).

In my talk I will present a freedom-based account of our duty to assist wild animals. I will argue, first, that animals can be free or unfree. They cannot assess normative or evaluative principles, but they update their intentional states and choose according to them in pursuit of their aims. This kind of control is all that freedom requires. In order not to compromise it, we should relate to animals in ways compatible with the practical standards implicit in their rational and volitional activity.

Second, guaranteeing their freedom requires us to recognise animals as our fellow citizens, immune from the unjustified interferences of others. But being in control is compatible with both scant and abundant opportunities for choice. The most important choice-situations of wild animals are restricted to flee-or-fight, greater or lesser suffering, or a more or less painful death. Concern for their freedom also requires us to improve the richness of their choices, if necessary by modifying nature.

Avr
22
jeu
2021
Nabina Liebow (American University) @ Zoom.
Avr 22 @ 12:00 – 13:30
Nabina Liebow (American University) @ Zoom.
Dans le cadre de la série de conférences féministes, Federica Berdini et ses collègues reçoivent Nabina Liebow (American University), qui offrira une présentation intitulée « « Don’t Be So Angry! »: Emotion Regulation and Racial Justice ». 

Abstract

Emotion regulation” refers to acts performed with the goal of modifying an emotion. In this presentation, we will explore the role that emotion regulation plays in sustaining racial injustice. In some cases, emotion regulation can cause individuals to experience emotions ill-suited for motivating antiracism. In other cases, individuals experience emotions that are well-suited for motivating antiracism, but they undergo emotion regulation that counteracts these feelings. In both cases, emotion regulation techniques are imposed to minimize levels of motivation for antiracist praxis. With this in mind, I propose that emotion regulation can and must be repurposed for antiracist ends. To conclude, I make some preliminary suggestions about what this repurposing might look like. 

Bio

Nabina Liebow is a lecturer at American University in the department of Philosophy and Religion and she directs the College of the Arts and Sciences Leadership and Ethical Development Program. Her current research is focused on Critical Philosophy of Whiteness, Practical Ethics, and Moral Psychology. She is passionate about making philosophy accessible and exciting to students from all backgrounds.

Avr
26
lun
2021
Dans l’ombre des circonstances de la justice @ Zoom
Avr 26 @ 11:00 – 12:00
Dans l’ombre des circonstances de la justice @ Zoom

Présentation de Yann Allard-Tremblay intitulée « Dans l’ombre des circonstances de la justice », dans le cadre du cycle de conférences du thème phare Antiracisme et décolonisation.

Via Zoom.

Résumé:

La philosophie politique occidentale prend généralement pour objet l’idée de justice. David Hume et John Rawls ont formulé de manière canonique l’idée que la justice est un concept dont la pertinence s’impose dans des circonstances particulières. Suivant ces penseurs, les circonstances de la justice sont comprises comme un contexte de rareté relative entre individus plus ou moins égaux ayant des passions et des intérêts conflictuels. Or, cette idée ne permet pas uniquement de situer le contexte du discours portant sur la justice, il limite également notre capacité à concevoir la justice autrement.

Afin de déconstruire cette idée, nous nous intéresserons à l’action de grâce de la Confédération Haudenosaunee. Ces mots qui viennent avant tous les autres visent à remercier le Créateur ainsi qu’à reconnaître nos relations avec les autres-qu’humains. Ils nient la perception occidentale de rareté pour plutôt mettre l’accent sur l’abondance. Conséquemment, nous proposons de réfléchir aux manières de concevoir la justice politique et sociale rendues possibles lorsque l’on débute avec ces circonstances autres. Nous argumentons, notamment, que le Juste peut dès lors être pensée comme reposant sur des relations de dépendance et de responsabilités plutôt que comme cherchant à établir une distribution équitable et à garantir le tien et le mien. Ultimement, ceci permet de mettre la lumière sur des conceptions du Juste qui reposent dans l’ombre des circonstances de la justice.

Avr
27
mar
2021
Simona Capisani (Harvard University) @ Préinscription requise | Registration required: ely.mermans@umontreal.ca
Avr 27 @ 14:00 – 16:00
Simona Capisani (Harvard University) @ Préinscription requise | Registration required: ely.mermans@umontreal.ca

Le GRÉEA reçoit Simona Capisani (Harvard University), qui offrira une présentation intitulée « The Right to a Livable Locality and Climate Displacement in the Territorial State System ».

Résumé

People have primarily inhabited a restricted range of temperatures on the surface of the earth for most of human history. This “human climate niche” is now threatened due to anthropogenic climate change, and a significant portion of these areas is likely to become far less habitable. Many have and will continue to be forced to move within and across national borders. Those without the means to adaptive mobility face a myriad of challenges and intersecting injustices as the livability of the places they occupy continues to deteriorate.

This talk takes a “practice-based” approach to answering questions regarding the nature of our obligations to those displaced by climate change. The normative ground I defend can help identify what kinds of adaptive adjustments are both reasonable and necessary for meeting the demands of justice for climate-induced displacement and migration. Specifically, the talk identifies and explicates a basic right people at risk of displacement have a claim to– the right to a livable locality. I argue that such a right establishes a correlative moral “associative obligation” to climate displaced persons. A principle of protection thus emerges as a requirement of legitimacy for the international state system understood as a social practice. To more fully account for the right, this talk raises and aims to answer the following question: what is an embodied individual and community’s relation to its space in a territorial state system such that, if the qualities or the physical location changes, that space is still livable?

In answer to this question, I argue that we need a “dynamical” notion of a livable space, which allows us to assess what changes in location people can or cannot be reasonably asked to adapt to. Second, we need an account that explains why “basic needs” are related in a constitutive, rather than merely instrument way, to location. I argue that as embodied human beings within a territorial state system, the relationship to a livable space is not merely incidental. Rather, being under conditions where livable space can no longer be guaranteed is morally relevant for participants in a social practice which is territorially all-encompassing and territorially exclusive.

Groupe de lecture en philosophie de l’écologie @ Préinscription: boisvert.anne-marie@uqam.ca
Avr 27 @ 19:30 – 21:30
Groupe de lecture en philosophie de l'écologie @ Préinscription: boisvert.anne-marie@uqam.ca

8e rencontre du Groupe de lecture en philosophie de l’écologie (via ZOOM)
(Coorganisé par Anne-Marie Boisvert, Antoine C. Dussault, Véronica Ponce)

Préinscription: boisvert.anne-marie@uqam.ca

Article à l’étude : Bryant, R. (2012). “What if Communities are not Wholes? », in Kabasenche, W.P. et al. (eds.), The Environment: Philosophy, Science, and Ethics, MIT Press, pp.37-56.

Ce groupe de lecture est organisé dans le cadre des activités du Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST) et du Groupe de recherche en éthique environnementale et animale (GRÉEA)

Avr
28
mer
2021
ANNULÉ! A Place for Coping in Action Theory @ Zoom
Avr 28 @ 12:30 – 13:45
ANNULÉ! A Place for Coping in Action Theory @ Zoom

Dans le cadre des midis de l’éthique du CRÉ, Federica Berdini nous offrira une présentation intitulée « A Place for Coping in Action Theory ».

Sur Zoom.

Mai
4
mar
2021
Les invisibles et inaudibles de la philosophie
Mai 4 – Mai 6 Jour entier

Dans le cadre du Congrès annuel de la SPQ, un événement intitulé « Les invisibles et inaudibles de la philosophie » sera l’occasion d’entendre Christine Tappolet offrir le 4 mai une conférence intitulée « L’indicible contenu des émotions », Soumaya Mestiri le 5 mai offrir une conférence intitulée « Des savoirs locaux? Remarques autour du normativement correct », puis Louis-André Dorion le 6 mai offrir une conférence intitulée « Les oubliés et les disparus de la philosophie ancienne ».

Mai
6
jeu
2021
CRÉ, Parr & Chaire Hoover @ Zoom
Mai 6 – Mai 7 Jour entier

Rencontre annuel des chercheur.se.s du CRÉ, du Parr et de la Chaire Hoover!

Co-organisé par Christine Tappolet, Sarah Stroud et Axel Gosseries.

Le programme préliminaire est le suivant:

Le 6 mai

Le 6 mai

9h00  Jules Salomone-Sehr (CRÉ), “Dissociated Agency: How to Φ at Will Without Intending to Φ

10h00 Michael Prinzing (Parr), “Meaningfulness as Mattering: Can Insight be Gained by Exploring the Implications of a Platitude?”

11h00 Pause

11h15 Rodrigo Diaz (CRÉ), “The role of emotion in moral thought and action”

12h15 Fernanda Pérez Gay Juárez (CRÉ), “Belief in conspiracy theories throughout the COVID-19 crisis : An ethical approach to epistemic mistrust”

Le 7 mai

9h00   Niko Väänänen (Chaire Hoover): « Should pension (benefit) depend on the number of children? »

10h00 Denise Celentano (CRÉ), « When Your Boss Is an Algorithm: The Problem with the Re-Taylorization of Labor and Algorithmic Management »

11h00 Pause

11h15 Manuel Valente (Chaire Hoover) : “Two Types of Age-Sensitive Taxation”

12h15 Karl Martin Adam (Parr), “The Problem of Supererogation: A Rossian Response”

/home/lecreumo/public html/wp content/uploads/2021/03/poster copie

Mai
11
mar
2021
« Qui en est responsable ? / Who’s Responsible for This? » @ Zoom
Mai 11 – Mai 12 Jour entier
"Qui en est responsable ? / Who’s Responsible for This?" @ Zoom
Les étudiantes boursières et étudiants boursiers du Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ) sont heureux.ses de vous annoncer la tenue du 3e colloque étudiant du CRÉ intitulé « Qui en est responsable ? ».
Ce colloque sera l’occasion d’explorer les différents aspects de la responsabilité individuelle et de la responsabilité collective. D’une part, dans une perspective métaéthique, nous examinerons les propriétés conceptuelles de ces deux notions, en tant que valeur ou principe. D’autre part, nous souhaitons porter notre attention sur les questions d’éthique pratique qui requièrent leur utilisation. À cet égard, les communications pourront aborder différents enjeux éthiques de notre temps, que ce soit en science politique, en philosophie, en sciences de la santé humaines et animales, en sciences sociales, en sciences environnementales, etc. Nous encourageons les communications issues de disciplines variées et s’inscrivant dans différents courants théoriques et méthodologiques.
________________
The recipients of the 2020 Centre for Research on Ethics (CRE) scholarship are pleased to announce the CRE’s 3rd student annual conference entitled “Who’s Responsible for This?
The conference will focus on various aspects of individual and collective responsibility as a concept, value, and principle, and on how these intersect with contemporary ethical theory and practice in all fields, including, but by no means limited to, philosophy, political science, human and animal health, and environmental science, among others.
Mai
13
jeu
2021
Alisa Bierria (University of California, Riverside) @ Zoom
Mai 13 @ 12:00 – 13:30
Alisa Bierria (University of California, Riverside) @ Zoom
Title: Reason, Agency, & Phantom Intentions

Abstract:
In previous work, I proposed a concept of « racial conflation, » or the conceptual conflation of « blackness » and « criminality, » as a framework to understand how black agentic action in the U.S. is persistently vulnerable to being re-authored through a frame of criminality. In this talk, I employ racial conflation as a tool to explore how black survivors of domestic and sexual violence are vacated of their self-determined intentions and supplanted with “phantom intentions” as the official explanatory narrative about their experiences of navigating conditions of violence and chaos.

Bio: Alisa Bierria is an assistant professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is developing a manuscript entitled, Missing in Action: Agency, Race, & Invention, which explores how intentional action is socially imagined in contexts of anti-black racism, carceral reasoning, and gendered violence. Alisa’s writing is published in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, Journal of Social Philosophy, Journal of Popular Music Studies, and in numerous scholarly volumes and anthologies.